Students with PTSD, Disabilities, and TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury)

So, first, let’s start by saying not all military veterans have PTSD or TBI, my husband doesn’t have either. Not all military veterans attending college have mental health issues (Baechtold & De Sawal, 2009). Not all military veterans are going to be disabled, and if they are considered disabled by the VA, you might not know it. If there is a student on your campus with PTSD, they are not likely to have it so bad that it’s out of control, if it was that bad, they wouldn’t be on campus. Not without a lot of support. Also: military veterans are not the only people who can be diagnosed with PTSD. Anyone who has ever had a traumatic experience can be diagnosed with PTSD. Anyone.

Now, onto the research: Women military veterans are less likely to be diagnosed with PTSD than men (Baechtold & De Sawal, 2009). Situations that are stressful to 18-24 year old men may not be as stressful to women (Baechtold & De Sawal, 2009). Sexual harassment or assault while in the military is considered military sexual trauma (Baechtold & De Sawal, 2009).

Also: Yes, some military personnel experience a traumatic brain injury. Between 11 and 28 percent of combat troops have “some level of traumatic brain injury” (DiRamio & Spires, 2009).

Remember how I said severely injured military veterans probably won’t make it to campus without a lot of support? There is a program called Fulfilling Their Dream, which was created for severely injured military veterans (DiRamio & Spires, 2009). Established by the American Council on Education (ACE) and is privately funded, it serves severely injured veterans and their families (DiRamio & Spires, 2009). NASPA works with ACE to find a mentor at the veteran’s chosen college or university to assist with the transition to higher education (DiRamio & Spires, 2009).


Works Cited

Baechtold, M., & De Sawal, D. M. (2009). Meeting the needs of women veterans. New Directions For Student Services. In R. Ackerman, & D. DiRamio, Creating a veteran-friendly campus: Strategies for transition and success (New Directions for Student Services No. 126, pp. 35-43). San Fransisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

DiRamio, D., & Spires, M. (2009). Partnering to assist disabled veterans in transition. New Directions For Student Services. In R. Ackerman, & D. DiRamio, Creating a veteran-friendly campus: Strategies for transition and success (New Directions for Student Services No. 126, pp. 81-88). San Fransisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

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